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Wild Rose-tini

June 17, 2019

Wild Rose-tini

Everyone enjoys a festive drink. Whether you be imbibing or not, this fun and floral Wild Rose-tini is the perfect summer sipper for an evening with friends.
The Wild Rose-tini
Ingredients:
1.5oz Rose Petal Shrub No. 5
1.5oz White Rum or Vodka or seltzer*
.75oz Honey Simple Syrup (recipe follows)
3 drops Bitter Tears, Hibiscus Rose Bitters (optional)
Lemon Twist
Pinch Maine Sea Salt (optional)
Tulsi Leaves and Rosa Rugosa Petals for garnish

Make:
In a cocktail shaker, add Rose Petal Shrub No. 5, White Rum or Vodka, Honey Simple Syrup, bitters, and ice. Shake vigorously and strain into a chilled coupe. Add a twist of lemon, just to get the essential oils, discard. Sprinkle with a pinch of Maine Sea Salt and garnish with fresh Tulsi leaves, flowers, or rose petals. 

*For a mocktail version of this drink, combine all the ingredients in a highball glass, fill with ice, stir, and top with seltzer. Total amount of seltzer added will be anywhere from 2oz-6oz. This will depend on your personal taste, and how tangy you like your drink. Garnish with freshly harvested rose petals and tulsi, and serve with a flowery paper straw.
 
Honey Simple Syrup:
1c honey
1c water

Combine in a saucepan and bring to a low boil. Allow to boil until the honey is dissolved. About 5 minutes. Keep a careful eye on this as it can boil quickly, and if you're not careful, it can burn rather easily.
Cheers!
Rose Petal Shrub No. 5 - Herbalrevolution




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